How To Secure Your Chromebook: 6 Tips and Tricks

Image by Jack Wallen

Find out how to better secure your Chromebook with these easy tips.
1. Secure your Google account

No matter how hard you work to secure that Chromebook, the security of that device is only as strong as the password used by the account holder. Not only should the account use a very strong, very unique password, it should make use of two-factor authentication

2. Configure Chrome

The Chrome browser offers settings apart from Chrome OS. Considering you’ll be spending the vast majority of your time on Chrome OS within the browser, you’ll want to make sure to change a few of the default settings.

3. Ensure your Chrome OS is up-to-date

It never ceases to amaze me how often I find users simply don’t bother applying updates. With each upgrade released for Chrome OS (or any OS, for that matter), vulnerabilities are patched and new features are added. When an operating system is left to its own devices, it won’t upgrade. That leaves you (or your Chromebook user) vulnerable.  It is imperative that updates be applied as soon as possible.

4. Install Google Find My Device

If your Chromebook has access to the Google Play Store (which most new Chromebooks do), you’ll want to install the Google Find My Device service.

5. Use caution with Chrome extensions

People tend to get a bit overzealous when it comes to extensions. I’ve seen users with a staggering number of installed extensions. Don’t be that user. Why? We’ve seen too many extensions that have compromised the security of user data. Some of these extensions are even from well established companies.

6. Enable sleep locking on a Chromebook

One option you might not know about is sleep locking. After using your Chromebook you close the lid, assuming it’s safe from prying eyes. That’s not always the case. If you lift that lid back up, you’ll notice you are right back in, no password required. This isn’t always the safest route to go. Instead, you’ll want to enable the Show Lock Screen Waking From Sleep option.

The information for this post was taken from an article by Jack Wallen in TechRepublic, follow this link for the complete article and more details.